ABCD Budokai Sverige Newaza & Grappling Studiesällskap (newaza/grappling Research group) 国際障害者武道文化協会スウェーデン 寝技と格闘研究会

UNOFFICIAL TRANSLATION

 

Shichitei Judo Tournament Rules

 

Preamble

 

Japan’s seven national universities began their Judo Tournament in 1952. The forerunners of this event were the Kosen Judo Tournaments dating back to before WWII. Today’s seven national universities are Hokkaido U., Tohoku U., Tokyo U., Nagoya U., Kyoto U., Osaka U., and Kyushu U. These schools share a storied tradition. Every year, their Judo clubs meet to test their skills against one another and see who trained hardest. This fierce, but friendly competition embodies the spirit of Shichitei Judo and keeps alive the Kosen tradition. Students train without respite, developing not only their minds and bodies, but their fighting spirit; and their endeavors, in turn, develop the art of Shichitei Judo, itself.

 

From its inception, Judo has been comprised of standing techniques and groundwork. Shichitei Judo has always emphasized the cultivation of the latter, strong Newaza. From the third tournament in 1954, Shichitei rules permit students to use Hikikomi to pull the opponent straight into Newaza. Also, Shichitei Judo emphasizes the uninterrupted flow of matches, allowing players to fully demonstrate their prowess by flexibly using the mat space in and outside the competition area to the greatest extent possible. Contestants are expected to understand the principles underlying these rules and compete with dignity and respect for their opponents.

 

(The above preamble was adopted in 1973.)

 

Competition Rules

 

Article #1

Each School sends one team of 20 players. Players must be current undergraduate students to qualify. However, where a student enters graduate school early (before completing four years of study or six years in the case of a medical student and certain other majors), the student remains qualified to participate in this tournament for the duration of their normal period of undergraduate studies (four or six years from matriculation).

 

Article #2

The day before the tournament, a Captains and Referees Conference shall be held. At this meeting, team pairings and the order of matches will be decided by lottery.

However, the school hosting the tournament shall always take the seventh slot.

 

Article #3

Each team will select 15 players from their roster to appear in the tournament. The remaining five are alternates who may be substituted in the event that one of the fifteen must withdraw due to injuries. Each team determines the order in which the players appear and is free to change the order for each match.

 

Article #4

Two tatami mats laid side by side creates a square area known in Japan as a “Ken”. The competition area shall be a 10-by-10 ken square area of 50 tatami mats with as wide an out-of-bounds space as possible.

 

Article #5

Matches shall take place within the competition area. However, where one or both of the players unintentionally leaves the completion area, as a general rule, the match shall continue unimpeded, but always at the judge’s discretion.

 

Article #6

This is a “Kachi-nuki Shiai” tournament in which a winner remains on the mat to fight the opposing team’s next player.

 

A player secures victory by scoring either Ippon or two Waza-ari scores. Alternatively, the match may end in a victory awarded in accord with Article 21 or Articles 24-27. The winner of a match remains on the mat to fight the opposing team’s next player. Any result other than those described above results in a draw and both players leave the . The next player in each team’s roster then enters the competition area to fight.

 

Article #7

If the fifteenth and final match results in a draw, both teams shall select one representative player to engage in a sudden death overtime match. If, after three sudden death overtime matches, there is no victor, the victor shall be chosen by lottery. In the case of the final match of the tournament, there is no limit on the number of sudden death overtime matches that may occur and there is nothing that shall prohibit a team from using the same player two or more times.

 

Article #8

Competition time is 6 minutes per match. However, the captain and vice-captain’s matches shall be for 8 minutes. Overtime matches shall be 6 minutes per match. The clock shall be stopped for the period of time that the judge stops a match.

 

Article #9

Each team shall draw upon their Club President, Head Instructor, Club Manager, coaches and alumni to provide, at a minimum, 2 Head Referees and 1 Assistant Judge. A judge shall be intimately familiar with these rules and be qualified to teach Shichitei Judo.

 

Article #10

A Head Referee and two Assistant Judges shall judge each match. The Head Referee shall be either a head instructor or someone of similar qualification. The judges for each match shall be selected from the pool of candidates provided by schools other than those fighting in the match. The use of two or more judges from the same university shall be avoided.

 

Article #11

The players shall face each other from a distance of two tatami mats and bow to each other from the standing position. Then, each shall take a step forward and wait for the judge to commence the match by calling out, “Hajime”.

 

Article #12

At the end of a match, the players shall return to their starting positions, facing each other. Upon the judge’s final judgment (or other instructions), the players shall take one step back and bow to each other from the standing position.

 

Article #13

Both teams in a match shall appoint a timekeeper to keep time during the team matches. The timekeeper shall keep track of the following: (1) the match time limit;

(2) the time expired after the judge calls “Osaekomi”; (3) the time expired after the judge stops a match by calling “Mate!” or “Sono-mama!”.

 

Upon the end of the match or when the full time expires after the judge declares “Osaekomi”, the timekeeper shall ring a bell or otherwise inform the judges of this event. In the event that the judge declares “Osaekomi!” but then declares “Toketa!”, an escape, the timekeeper shall inform the judges of the time elapsed during Osaekomi in an appropriate manner.

 

Article #14

Each player shall wear a Judogi. One player shall tie a red and the other a white sash over the belt. The Judogi must meet the following criteria:

With the player’s belt tied, the jacket must extend far enough down to cover the buttocks.

The sleeve must be loose fitting with no less than 5cm of slack fabric at the point where the player’s forearm is thickest. The sleeve must be long enough to cover just over half the player’s forearm.

The Judo pants shall be loose fitting with slack of no less than 7cm at the thickest part of the lower leg. The pant legs must be long enough to cover just over half the player’s lower leg.

The belt shall be tied in an appropriate fashion to prevent the jacket from falling open. The belt shall be long enough to allow the two lengths of belt below the knot to extend for at least 15cm.

 

Article #15

The player shall keep their nails neatly trimmed and shall carry nothing on their body that might endanger the opponent.

 

Refereeing Rules

Article #16

There shall be no protest against the judges’ decision.

 

Article #17

The Head Referee shall judge from inside the competition area. The Head Referee is responsible for supervising the conduct of the match and deciding the victor. The assistant judges provide advice to the Head Referee. Two assistant judges shall judge each match from outside the competition area. The two shall monitor the match from positions that permit an unobstructed view of the match and that are away from each other.

 

Where an assistant judge disagrees with the Head Referee, the assistant judge shall quickly request a consultation with the Head Referee. After the consultation, the Head Referee may change his decision to reflect the opinion of the assistant judge.

 

Article #18

The technique of “Hikikomi” is permitted. Hikikomi means pulling the opponent into a

position where the opponent cannot stand upright and cannot break contact or return to the upright position without exerting significant effort to either lift the other player up or shake the other player loose.

 

Article #19

When the Head Referee judges that a player has scored Ippon through execution of nagewaza or Osaekomi, the Head Referee shall raise one hand straight up in the air and declare, “Ippon!”. This shall be followed by the Head Referee calling out, “Sore-made!” to stop the match. The Head Referee shall return the players to their starting positions and declare a winner, simultaneously indicating the winner by raising the appropriate hand straight up in the air.

 

Article #20

When the Head Referee judges that a player has scored Waza-ari, the Head Referee shall raise one hand facing palm down to shoulder height and declare, “Waza-ari”. Where the same player scores a second Waza-ari, the Head Referee shall raise a hand to shoulder height and declare, "Waza-ari-awasete-ippon!”, while also raising the hand straight up in the air to signify Ippon. This shall be followed by the Head Referee calling out, “Sore-made!” to stop the match. The Head Referee shall return the players to their starting positions and declare a winner, simultaneously indicating the winner by raising the appropriate hand straight up in the air.

 

Article #21

If one player scores Waza-ari and later the opponent is penalized with Keikoku (or vice-versa), the Head Referee shall declare, “Sogo-kachi-ippon” and stop the match. Upon returning the players to their starting positions, the Head Referee shall declare a victor, raising the appropriate hand.

 

Article #22

If competition time ends without one player scoring Ippon, the Head Referee shall call out “Sore-made!” and stop the match. Upon returning the players to their starting positions, the Head Referee shall raise his hand in front to shoulder level and while dropping to his side, declare a tie by calling out, “Hikiwake!”.

 

Article #23

In the event of any of the following, the Head Referee shall call out “Mate!”. The match shall be restarted by returning the players to their starting positions and calling out, “Hajime!”.

1.The Head Referee determines that the players have strayed outside of the competition area and can no longer continue to fight.

2.A player commits a Hansoku (violation).

3.A player is injured or becomes ill. 4.A player’s Judogi is ripped or torn.

5 .Where a player grabs his opponent from behind and lifts him, so that the opponent’s legs are in the air; or, alternatively, where the player stands up and lifts an opponent into the air after the opponent executes Sankaku Jime, so that the opponent’s back leaves the tatami.

One player stands upright and lifts the opponent, who is trying to execute Hikikomi, so that the opponent’s back and shoulders are no longer touching the tatami.

One player lies prone in the turtle position, and then neither player tries to attack or the players separate.

One player tries to execute Hikikomi but without grabbing the opponent or hooking the opponent with the legs, in which case the player who tried to execute Hikikomi has not shown the proper intent to fight.

Any other incident for which the Head Referee deems calling “Mate!” appropriate.

 

Note: Any technique executed prior to the Head Referee calling “Mate!” shall be allowed, even where executed outside of the competition area.

 

Article #24

The Head Referee shall penalize a player who commits any violation listed in Article 26, awarding a Chui, Keikoku, or Hansoku-make depending on the gravity of the violation. The decision to award a penalty requires the concurrence of all the referees and judges.

 

Rule 25

A violation shall be evaluated and awarded an appropriate penalty according to the below guidelines. Where conduct approaches a violation, but does not qualify, the judge may award a “Shido” or instruction.

 

Chui (Caution) – A minor violation shall be penalized with Chui. To award a Chui, the Head Referee shall halt the match and upon returning the players to their starting standing positions, shall declare, Chui!.

 

Keikoku (Warning) – A moderately severe violation shall be penalized with

Keikoku. In addition, a player who commits a second Chui shall receive a Keikoku. To award a Keikoku, the Head Referee shall halt the match and upon returning the players to their starting positions where they shall assume kneeling positions, the Head Referee shall declare, “Keikoku!”. A Keikoku shall be scored as if the opposing player earned a Waza-ari.

 

Hansoku-make (Disqualification) – A severe violation shall be penalized with Hansoku-make. A player who previously was penalized with Keikoku (or two Chui) shall receive Hansoku-make for an additional Chui or Keikoku level infraction. To award Hansoku-make, the Head Referee shall halt the match and upon returning the players to their starting positions where they shall assume Seiza (the kneeling position), the Head Referee shall declare, “Hansoku-make!”. A Keikoku shall be scored as if the opposing player earned Ippon.

 

In the event a player is injured by an act qualifying as Hansoku-make and, as determined by the judges, is unable to compete in the next match, the player’s team may substitute a player from the roster of alternates.

 

Article #26

Any act meeting the below criteria shall be deemed a violation and shall be penalized as described follows:

Any violation meeting the criteria of subsections 1-6.2 shall be deemed

Hansoku-make.

Any violent act that violates the spirit of Judo.

Any throw executed while the player entangles his leg with his opponents in Kawazu-kake fashion (winding one leg around the opponent's leg, while facing more or less in the same direction as the opponent and falling backwards onto him).

Intentionally attacking any joint other than the elbow.

Attacking the opponent’s joint after the Head Referee calls “Mate!”.

Initiating a throw by seizing the opponent and then executing Uchimata, Hanegoshi, or Haraigoshi while diving head first towards the tatami.

From the standing position, falling directly to the tatami while simultaneously applying an elbow lock.

6.2. Execution of Kani-basami (a scissor leg or crab leg) takedown.

 

A penalty of Keikoku or Hansoku-make shall be awarded for any act meeting the criteria defined in subsections 7-11:

Any act which risks bodily harm to the opponent.

Any comment or swear that violates the spirit of Judo.

9. Reaping the opponent’s standing leg from the inside when being attacked with

Haraigoshi, Uchimata, or similar technique.

Any act that risks injury to the neck or spine of either player.

When grabbed from behind, the player seizes the opponent and throws himself and the opponent together backwards.

 

A Penalty of Chui or Keikoku shall be awarded for any act meeting the criteriadefined in subsections 12-26

Intentionally exiting the competition area.

Intentionally pushing an opponent outside of the competition area.

Avoiding engaging with the opponent.

Any technique other than a joint lock executed after the Head Referee calls “Mate”.

Failure to obey the Head Referee’s instructions.

Using the legs to scissor andsqueeze the opponent’s head, neck or torso with force.

Intentionally slamming an opponent into the tatami where the player either lifted the opponent up from the ground (while fighting from his back) or where the opponent had been hugging the player while in the air.

Kicking free the opponent’s grip on the player’s Judogi or belt using the player’s foot, knee or any part of the leg.

Maintaining a grip with the player’s fingers intertwined with the fingers of the opponent.

Intentionally adjusting the player’s uniform or re-tying the belt without the Head Referee’s permission.

Wrapping the Judogi jacket hem or the end of the belt around the arm of the opponent more than once.

Directly contact the opponent’s face with a hand or foot.

Directly placing a foot on the belt or collar while executing a Newaza technique or jamming an opponent’s fingers backwards to free them.

25. While in the standing position, repeatedly leaving the competition area without

paying attention.

26. Gripping fewer than three of the opponent’s fingers.

 

Article #27

In a situation where the player’s injury or illness is not caused by the opponent’s

violation of these rules, the Head Referee, in consultation with the injured or ill player’s team, shall determine whether the player can continue the match. If the player is deemed unable to continue, the Head Referee shall declare, “Itami-make!”, signifying that the player is unfit to continue for medical reasons and must withdraw. The opponent shall remain on the tatami and face the next opponent.

 

Article #28

The following techniques qualify as Ippon:

Throwing techniques.

By executing a technique, avoiding the opponent’s technique, or countering the opponent’s technique, if a player throws the opponent fully onto his back with force or momentum, this shall be deemed Ippon. Alternatively, if the player is thrown and avoids landing on his back solely by striking the mat with his head and feet and bridging out, this too shall be deemed Ippon.

(Deleted.)

Ground Techniques

A player indicates submission by either calling out, “Maitta” or by tapping the opponent, himself, or the tatami at least two times with his hand or foot.

lf the player holds the pin for 30 seconds after the Head Referee calls “Osaekomi” and the opponent fails to escape the pin.

A player is rendered unconscious through the application of a choke, the elbow is dislocated or the upper arm (humerus) is broken. However, if a player fully executes a joint lock, the Head Referee may determine it appropriate to award Ippon.

 

Article #29

Waza-ari shall be awarded where a player executes the following: 1. Where the technique is close but not quite deserving of Ippon.

2. Where a player holds a pin for 25 seconds or more after the Head Referee

declares Osaekomi.

3. Where a player attempts Tomoenage and fails, but continues to attempt the throw from the ground and later throws the opponent cleanly.

 

Article #30

Upon confirming a player has fully secured a valid Osaekomi, the Head Referee shall extend his hand downwards towards the players and call out “Osaekomi!”. If the opponent escapes the Osaekomi, the Head Referee shall call out “Toketa!” and wave his hand left and right multiple times.

 

Article #31

Rules for continuing a match outside the competition area are as follows:

If a player secures Osaekomi and the players are outside the competition area in a place where the Head Referee deems that the match cannot continue unimpeded, the Head Referee shall call out “Sono-mama” and the players shall halt their grappling, but shall retain the same positions that they held at the time that the Head Referee called “Sono-mama”. The players shall be dragged as they are to an appropriate place within the competition area. Upon the Head Referee calling out, “Yoshi!”, the match shall resume.

Where the players leave the competition area in the course of executing Newaza and the Head Referee determines that the match cannot continue unimpeded, the Head Referee shall call out “Sono-mama!” and if the Head Referee perceives that the players can be moved back to the competition area without changing their relative positions, they shall be moved back to an appropriate place inside the competition area in the same manner as subsection 1 above.

Subsection 2 may be applied to players who leave the competition area while standing as well.

 

Article #32

A throw executed simultaneously with the bell sounding the end of the match shall be deemed valid. In the situation where Osaekomi is declared and the match time ends, the match shall continue until the Osaekomi’s outcome is determined.

 

Article #33

When an event not described herein occurs that requires the judges’ attention, the registered referees and judges shall confer and render a decision.

 

Addendum

Article #34

Revisions to these rules shall be undertaken at the Captains and Referees Conference.

 

Article #35

These rules took effect July 17, 1982.

 

Article #36

The day before a tournament under these rules, the club president, head instructor,

registered head referees and assistant judges, club manager, team captain, and other competent representatives of each school shall hold a Captains and Referees Conference. At the conference, the present representatives shall decide the rules and the conduct of the tournament and determine the matching of teams by lottery.

 

Article #37

After a Shichitei Judo Tournament, the club president, head instructor, registered head referees and assistant judges, club manager, team captain, and other competent representatives of each school shall conduct a Post-Tournament Conference at which they shall review the conduct of the tournament and discuss proposals for improving these rules and future tournaments.

 

Article #38

An official decision at the Captains and Referees Conference require the agreement of the representatives of at least five of the schools. Ideally, however, a change to the preamble to these rules shall be undertaken with unanimous consensus.

Rules and Operating Procedures for the Shichitei Judo Women’s Matches

 

Tournament Rules

As a general principle, the Shichitei Judo Tournament Rules shall apply, but with the following exceptions:

Rules on number of players and team composition (Rules #1 and #3 above) Each school shall send a team of five players.

(Operating Procedure: If a school cannot field five players, two or more schools may combine their players. This shall be done as an exception as the purpose of the tournament is for the schools to compete against one another. If there is no alternative, a Kohaku Shiai may be held, in which case, a school may enter more than 5 players into the competition.)

Qualified Players (Article #1 above)

Where a team cannot field enough qualified undergraduate players, the team may seek permission at the Captains and Referees Conference to supplement the player roster with one or more undergraduate students from another university who has trained with the team in a manner consistent with the training undertaken by the school’s female players.

(Operating Procedure: Recognizing the inconsistency in female athlete numbers, even where an undergraduate player from another school has not met the requirement of training consistently with the team’s female players, exception may be made at the Captains and Referees Conference to permit that player to compete in this tournament.)

Tournament forMateam pairings and order of matches (Rules #2 and #6).

Where three schools send teams, a round-robin tournament shall be held in which each team plays the other two. Where four or more schools send a team, a single-elimination tournament shall be held.

(Operating Procedure: Where every team sends at least two, but less than four players, the tournament shall be held in a 3-players-per-team format. Where there is no choice but to hold a Kohaku Shiai, multiple matches may be held to allow the players to be switched in and out. This last decision shall be made by the school hosting the tournament.)

Sudden Death Overtime Match (Article #7).

One sudden death overtime match shall be held.

(In a round robin tournament, if the sudden death overtime match ends in a tie, the result shall be hikiwake. In the case where three teams each wins one and loses one match, the outcome shall be determined as follows:

If the 3 teams tie in the final round: the tournament ends and no victor shall

be declared. (CHECK)

Where the final round has not been held, one team shall be selected by lottery as victor and shall proceed to the next round. (CHECK)

Match Time (Article #8)

All matches including those for the Captain and Co-Captain shall be 6 minutes.

 

Miscellaneous (Operating Procedures) Tournament Schedule

Where 3 or less teams compete: The tournament shall take place between the men’s loser bracket matches on the first day.

Where 4 or more teams compete: The tournament shall take place between the men’s losers bracket proceeding up to the final round. The final round shall take place on the second day before the men’s final round.

Awards

The winning team shall receive an award.

If the final round ends in a tie, both teams shall be declared victor.

There shall be no award for the winner of Kohaku Shiai.

Judges’ Rules

“Shichitei Judo Tournament Rules” shall apply.

Miscellaneous

“Shichitei Judo Tournament Supplementary Operating Rules” shall apply.

Shichitei Judo Tournament Supplementary Operating Rules

 

1. The following was agreed upon at the Tohoku University Captains and Referees Conference in 1988:

(1) Where a referee mistakenly halts a match, the referee shall explain the circumstances behind the mistake.

 

2. The following was agreed upon at the Nagoya University Captains and Referees Conference in 1989:

The Head Instructor of the host school shall act as the Senior Tournament Judge and be responsible for oversight of the tournament. In addition, the host school shall provide two Head Referees and one Assistant Judge.

The Captains and Referees Conference shall be the last chance to make changes to a team’s player and alternates roster.

If the order of appearance for a team’s players contains an error or omission, this alone is not a basis for a correction. Notwithstanding this, in light of the various mistakes that have occurred, rules (2) and (3) shall be applied with some flexibility.

 

The following was agreed upon at the Nagoya University Post-Tournament Conference in 1989:

Make clear and decisive calls when the players move out of the competition area.

Call out “Mate”, “Sono-mama” and other judges’ calls more clearly.

Assistant Judges must vigorously express their views and judgment of techniques.

There shall be a second judges meeting on the morning of the second day. At that time, the results of the first day shall be presented.

While standing, there shall be no penalty for grabbing and holding same-side collar with both hands or gripping the pants as protection.

 

The following was agreed upon at the Hokaido University Captains and Referees Conference in 1990:

Throwing a turtled opponent will be permitted as a way of turning the opponent, but will not be scored as a throw. Furthermore, where the two players are engaging in newaza and one stands suddenly and executes a throw, that throw shall not be scored as tachiwaza.

Hikikomi Gaeshi and Sumigaeshi executed from a standing position may be scored as Nagewaza. Udegaeshi shall not be scored as Nagewaza.

Executing Hikikomi without gripping the opponent shall be penalized with a Chui. However, if the grip slips during the execution of the Hikikomi, the award of a Chui is at the discretion of the judges.

The match shall not be stopped where the players stalemate due to the use of

Ashigarami or Nijugarami.

The rules on exiting the competition area remain unchanged, but where a player intentionally leaves the competition area, the player shall swiftly be penalized with Chui. (The point here is to promote strict enforcement of Article 12, Article #26.)

An Assistant Judge shall express his intent through clear and forceful gestures.

 

The following was agreed upon at the Hokaido University Post-Tournament Conference in 1990:

(1) The Head Referee may penalize a player who uses the hand or collar to repeatedly rub the face above the mouth or otherwise harm the face of the opponent with Chui or Keikoku.

 

The following was agreed upon at the Kyoto University Captains and Referees Conference in 1993:

The following acts are properly penalized with a Chui:

l Faking a Hikikomi and falling back without gripping the opponent or;

l pretending to grip the opponent and sitting down; or

l faking a Morotegari leg tackle while clinging onto the opponents leg in a passive manner

However, whether attacked by Hikikomi or not, a penalty shall never be awarded for simply picking the opponent up off the ground.

The judges shall handle activities outside the competition area in a way that prioritizes the non-interrupted flow of the match. However, when the players are standing, the Head Referee must bear in mind the physical surroundings and the safety of the players and should call Mate when appropriate. For players engaging in Newaza, the Head Referee may call Sono-mama when there is a lull in the action and drag the players back into the competition area.

When one player acts in a way worthy of a Shido, but the two players quickly progress into further action, the judges may observe the situation and wait until the appropriate juncture to issue the Shido.

In judging a throw, the judges shall emphasize the sharpness and effect of the technique and award it an appropriate score.

The judges shall accord deference to the judgment of the Head Referee, but where an Assistant Judge disagrees with the Head Referee’s decision, the Assistant

Judge shall swiftly and clearly indicate so to the Head Referee and the judges shall confer.

 

The following was agreed upon at the Tokyo University Captains and Referees Conference in 1995:

Rules pertaining to the players’ Judo shall be strictly enforced and Judogis shall be checked before the tournament begins. (It shall be the responsibility of each team’s manager to undertake this check.)

As provided above, an Assistant Judge shall swiftly and clearly indicate disagreement with the Head Referee’s decision; and upon conferring, the Head Referee may change his decision and adopt the recommendation of the Assistant Judge. However, for example, where the Head Referee calls Waza-ari but the Assistant Judges indicate Koka-nashi (no score), there is a need for the judges to confer and reach a consensus, but doing so will require a halt to the match in order for the judges to confer and reach agreement. In this instance, the Head Referee may accept the recommendation of the Assistant Judges and proceed accordingly even though, technically speaking, the Head Referee does not agree.

Where an Assistant Judge disagrees with the Head Referee, the Assistant Judge shall swiftly and clearly indicate so. The Head Referee shall consider the flow of the match and decide whether to confer.

As provided for above, Mate should be called where a player commits a violation, but in the situation where the player committing the violation is in a disadvantageous position and there is no risk to the safety of the players, it is permitted for the match to continue and award the penalty when the action later stops.

New forms of Osaekomi (such the Osaekomi transition from Yoku Sankaku (side triangle)) are not recognized. Although not clearly stated in the rules, inserting a finger inside of the cuff of the opponent’s sleeve or pant leg may be grounds for issuing a Chui. Where a player exits the competition area unintentionally, the judge may award a Shido with an admonition to stay in the center of the competition area. If the player continues to leave the competition area, it is appropriate to issue a Chui.

Determining the team from the losers bracket that shall proceed to the semi-final round.

The school with two victories shall proceed to the semi-final round.

Where the regulation matches end in a tie, a maximum of three sudden death overtime matches shall take place in accord with Article #7. If the three sudden death overtime matches end in a tie, the winner shall be decided by lottery and shall proceed to the next round.

Where three schools tie with 1 win and 1 loss, the victor shall be decided

between them by lottery and the victor shall proceed.

Standing up from Newaza and fighting from a standing position shall not be stopped.

 

The following was agreed upon at the Kyushu University Post-Tournament Conference in 1998:

A player who is penalized with Keikoku followed by Chui shall forfeit by Hansoku-make. A player who is penalized with Chui followed by Keikoku shall forfeit by Hansoku-make.

A Player who has been penalized with a Chui shall commits a second Chui shall be penalized Keikoku for the second Chui. This rule shall apply even where the violation committed for the second Chui is different than the first.

A second Chui for the same offense shall be penalized with Keikoku.

 

The following was agreed upon at the Kyoto University Captains and Referees Conference of 2000:

(Deleted.)

 

The following was agreed upon at the Kyoto University Post-Tournament Conference of 2000:

The host school shall appoint a doctor on call and identify the doctor in the tournament pamphlet. Each school shall identify the emergency room nearest to the school dormitory and put the contact information in either the tournament pamphlet or the Captains and Referees Conference materials.

When pulling Hikikomi, the player must pull the opponent down by grabbing the opponent above the belt with both hands. Failure to do so is worthy of a Chui penalty.

(Deleted.)

 

The following was agreed upon at the Osaka University Pre-Tournament Conference in 2005:

When transitioning from Yoku Sankaku (side triangle) to Osaekomi, Osaekomi shall be recognized where the players’ front torsos are touching and the buttocks of the player who is pinning are not touching the tatami. Otherwise, the Osaekomi shall not be valid. Furthermore, a player on the bottom who sweeps his opponent after securing Mae Sankaku (front triangle) and ends up riding the opponent in a kneeling position has not secured Osaekomi.

A player who forfeits a match due to Hansoku-make (where Hansoku-make

resulted from a single infraction and was not an accumulation of lesser penalties) shall be prohibited from the next match only.

Where a player executes a joint lock such as Ude Garami on the opponent and the opponent is resisting the pain at the risk of a dislocated shoulder, the Head Referee may call Mate. If the opponent’s elbow was in a position to be dislocated, the Judge shall award Ippon, but if the shoulder was in fact dislocated, the Judge shall penalize the player executing the joint lock with Hansoku-make.

A player who wins by Fusho-kachi (where the player wins because the opponent is disqualified for injuring the player) may not fight in the next match.

Deleted.

Deleted.

Article 19 of Article #26 remains in effect, but the thigh shall not qualify as a part of the leg for the application of this rule.

Article 23 of Article #26 remains in effect. Hansoku-make shall be called where a player escapes Kesa-gatame by striking the face of their opponent with the leg. However, a skillful escape from Kesa-gatame shall not be penalized.

Putting an opponent onto his back by applying a Key Lock shall be deemed a valid Osaekomi if the player retains control of the opponent.

A player shall not have secured Osaekomi where the player attempts the pin either by controlling an arm (such as a Kesa-gatame without holding the neck) or where the player is not facing the opponent or where the player’s back is facing the opponent. However, if the player secures a valid Osaekomi and then transitions to one of these positions while retaining control of the opponent, the Osaekomi shall remain valid.

Article 4 of this Supplementary Rule (11) refers to the situation where a player wins because of an injury-causing violation described in Article #25. Where the opponent’s violation causing the player to withdrawal was not Hansoku-make, but the judges determine that the player is not fit to continue due to the injury caused by the violation, the opponent shall be penalized with Hansoku-make.

 

The following was agreed upon at the Captains and Referees Conference in 2007:

In accord with Article #15, the use of hard contact lenses is prohibited.

(Deleted.)

Supplementary Rules (4)-(4) were not intended to restrict the judge to awarding only Chui. In a situation where a player commits a blatant violation (such as purposely running out of the competition area), a Keikoku may be given. In this sense, the meaning of Article #26, Article 12 (cited by those supplementary rules)

remains unchanged.

Mate shall not be called where the player jumps to avoid being entangled in the opponent’s legs and the match shall continue..

 

The following was agreed upon at the Tohoku University Captains and Referees Conference of 2008:

Tokyo University shall maintain a PDF copy of the official Shichitei Judo Tournament Rules as recognized by the seven schools available for download from the Tokyo University homepage. The other schools may link to the official PDF copy from their websites. Schools are strongly encouraged not to download the PDF and provide the downloaded file via alternative sites to avoid the circulation of outdated versions of the rules. A log of changes to the official rules shall be recorded at the end of the document.

As a general principle, a player shall adjust his Judo while standing, but the Head Referee may elect to employ other means as appropriate.

Where a player continues to try to apply a choke against an opponent whose collar is across the chin, the Head Referee shall call Mate, but if the player switches to another technique, the match shall proceed.

 

On November 30, 2008, a Special Captain and Judges Conference was held in Tokyo and the following was agreed upon:

Where a standing player wraps his arm around the opponent’s neck and executes Hikikomi Gaeshi, the technique shall be deemed a violation in accord with Article 10 of Article #26,

 

Publication Dates & History of Revisions l First Published – 9 May 2008 l Republished – 16 April 2009

l Third Republishing – 23 January 2010

l Fourth Republishing – 15 June 2010

 

[Translator’s Note: The official rules are in Japanese. If there is a discrepancy between this English version and the Japanese version, the Japanese version shall rule. Please note that this translation may not be kept up to date as the original Japanese rules are updated. July 2014.]

Glossary of Japanese Terms

(Not part of original Japanese document)

 

Ashi-garami or 脚 が ら み – This is the traditional term for the various ways of wrapping both legs around one leg of the opponent to entangle it and prevent the opponent from passing the legs (i.e., passing the guard) as well as to attack from the bottom. This technique is allowed unless applied dangerously (i.e., attacking the knee joint). See:

l http://www19.atwiki.jp/kyodaiJudo/pages/74.html

Chui or 注 意 – A caution. This is the lowest form of penalty.

 

Hajime or 始 め – Literally means “begin” and is the command used by the judge to start or restart a match.

 

Hanegoshi or 跳 腰 – One of the official Kodokan hip throws. The “Spring Hip Throw” is very similar to Uchimata, but the far leg is swept upwards instead of the near leg. See:

l http://Judoinfo.com/hanegoshi.htm.

 

Hansoku-make or 反 則 負 け – Forfeit of game due to violation. This is the most severe penalty.

 

Haraigoshi or 払 腰 – One of the original Kodokan throws. The “Sweeping Hip Throw” is just that, a combination of a hip throw and a leg sweep. See:

l http://Judoinfo.com/haraigo.htm.

 

Hikikomi or 引 き 込 み – This is the Kosen Judo equivalent of pulling guard. Most often, it is done by pulling the same-side collar and sleeve of the opponent while sitting down and placing a leg in the hip. See:

l https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r455t13dzX0#t=20

 

 

Hikikomi-gaeshi – 引 き 込 み 返 し This throw involves bending your opponent over and grabbing their belt and rolling them over top yourself. It is somewhat similar to the better known Sumigaeshi. See the first technique executed here:

l https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHdS_YrphkY&feature=kp

Please note that it is alternatively called Obitori Gaeshi or “帯取り返し”although the official rules do not use that term. See also:

l http://www19.atwiki.jp/kyodaiJudo/pages/44.html

 

Hikiwake or 引き分け – The Japanese word for tie or draw.

 

Ippon or 一 本 – A full point awarded for excellent technique. It wins the match and is basically the same concept as Ippon in Kodokan Judo with interpretative differences in certain circumstances.

 

Kachi-nuki Shiai or 勝 ち 抜 き 試 合 – This is a king-of-the-hill style team competition where each player fights until he or she loses or ties. At the end of a match, if one player wins, the player remains on the mat to face the next opponent. The loser leaves the mat. For a tie, both players leave the mat and are replaced by the next contestants. Victory is awarded to the team left with one or players standing when the other team’s last player loses or draws. Note: Sometimes also referred to as Kachi-nuki Sen or 勝 ち 抜 き 戦 .

 

Kani-basami or 蟹 挟 み – Literally “crab legs”, this technique is commonly known as “scissor legs” in English and is banned. See:

l https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Lpm6mAY4yU

 

Kawazu-kake or 河 津 掛 – This throw is permitted in Sumo and Sambo. It involves wrapping your leg around the opponents leg from the inside. See:

l https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYfM7rWm1RA

 

Keikoku or 警 告 – This is the penalty for infractions of mid-level severity (one of the three penalties awarded in Shichitei Judo).

 

Ken or 間 – This is an old measuring unit used in Japan. It is equivalent to two tatami mats (which form a square). The competition area is a 5-Ken square composed of 50 tatami mats (two per a ken).

 

Kesa-gatame or 袈 裟 固 め – This is the scarf hold pin in Judo secured by wrapping one arm around the opponent’s neck and holding the same-side arm with the far arm (often pinching underneath the player’s armpit. See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9kcVWg6FMu0.

 

Kohaku Shiai or 紅 白 試 合 – A red-and-white Tournament or Kohaku Shiai is a traditional style of tournament in which participants are lined up by size and split in

half (one by one). They then line up and starting with the first player (usually the smallest), commence a tournament. Kohaku Shiai is also Kachinuki Sen, so the winner of a match stays to fight again. In the case of a tie…]

 

Koka-nashi or 効 果 な し – Japanese term meaning “no effect”, it is used to signify that a player’s action did not qualify as a technique worthy of a score.

 

Kosen Judo or 高 専 柔 道 – An abbreviation of Koutou ・ Senmon Gakkou Judo or 高 等 ・ 専 門 学 校 柔 道 . Before WWII, there was a league of national high schools (the forerunners of today’s national universities) and vocational high schools that banded together and held a tournament every year that emphasized the use of Newaza. These schools were unable to beat the Kodokan-affiliated schools using throws, so they emphasized Newaza as a way to defeat opponents with better developed standing Judo. Shichitei Judo is Kosen Judo as practiced by the Judo teams of the seven national universities.

 

Mae-sankaku or 前 三 角 – This technique, the front triangle, refers to the act of wrapping the legs around an opponent’s neck and one arm where the attacking player is on his back and the opponent is leaning over them. It can be used as a control position. If a choke is applied, it is known as Mae Sankaku Jime or 前 三 角 締 め , which was developed at the forerunner to Kyoto U., National Highschool #6, before WWII. The choke version is demonstrated in the below video:

l https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPQf7p-4JpA

 

Maitta or 参 っ た – This is the traditional term for tapping out. It has been replaced in many English speaking countries by use of the word, “tap”.

 

Mate or 待 て – The term literally means “wait”. The Head Referee temporarily halts a match by calling Mate. Where Mate is called, the players return to their respective starting positions and await the Head Referee’s instruction to restart the match.

 

Morotegari or 双 手 刈 り – The Judo term for what is known to wrestlers as a double leg takedown. See:

l https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9_GPVq-5SM

 

Nagewaza or 投 げ 技 – The Japanese term for throw. Technically, Tachiwaza or 立 ち 技 means standing techniques and has a broader meaning, although the two terms are frequently used interchangeably.

 

Newaza or 寝 技 – The Japanese term for groundwork.

 

Nijugarami or 二 重 が ら み – This is the act of wrapping both legs around the opponent’s one leg so that the player’s one leg hooks the player’s other leg (at about knee area) with the opponent’s leg wrapped in between. The player’s other leg hooks under the opponent’s leg caught in between (at about the ankle). In modern grappling terms, this is known as the lockdown from the half-guard. The following demonstrates an escape from this technique:

l https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvQ8s8VfDfM

 

Sankaku or 三 角 – This is a control position where the player wraps his legs around the opponents head and one arm. It can be used defensively or offensively. As well as transitioning to other attacks such as an armbar, the offensive version of Sankaku is a choke and can be applied from the front (Mae or 前 ), side (Yoko or 横 ), rear (Ushiro or 後 ろ ) or reverse side (Ura or 裏 ). See:

l https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eOQXoXA7CdQ

l https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKpKucM0DVs

 

 

Sankaku-jime or 三 角 締 め – This is a choke applied using the legs. The player wraps his legs around the neck and one arm.

l https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eOQXoXA7CdQ

 

Seiza or 正 座 – The traditional Japanese kneeling position.

 

Shichitei Judo or 七 帝 柔 道 – This refers to the Newaza Judo or Kosen Judo that is practiced by the seven schools that compete in the Judo event of the Seven National University Sports Tournament (Nana Daigaku Judo Taikai or 七 大 学 柔 道 大 会 ). Although the name was changed to Nana Daigaku after WWII, the event is often referred to using the Pre-WWII abbreviation for what were then known as the seven imperial universities.

 

Shido or 指 導 – An instruction from the Judge to caution a player without penalizing the player for an infraction of the rules.

 

Sogo-kachi-ippon or 総合勝ち一本 – Where a player is awarded one Waza-ari and the other player is penalized with a Keikoku, the Keikoku is scored as Waza-ari for the

first player. Two Waza-ari is equivalent to Ippon, so the first player wins the match. Because one of the Waza-ari was caused by a violation, the proper term to use for describing this victory is Sogo Kachi Ippon, which translates roughly to “combined scores Ippon”. It does not Mater what order the penalty and Waza-ari are awarded.

 

Sono-mama or そ の ま ま – This term means, “freeze”. The Head Referee uses this term to temporarily halt the match with the added meaning that the players are to stop all movement and retain their current postures and relevant positions. This is the term that is used when the players are dragged by the judges back into the competition area to resume the match as is.

 

Sore-made そ れ ま で – This term means, “That’s it.” The Head Referee calls out, “Sore-made” to stop the contest. The players must return to their starting positions where the Judge will declare a victor or draw. Use of this term implies that the Head Referee recognizes that the match is over.

 

Sumigaeshi or 隅 返 し – This is an official Kodokan sacrifice throw. It requires that the player press his body to the opponent’s side, trapping the opponent’s near arm, and grabbing the belt. The player sits back and rolls the opponent over top himself. See:

l http://www19.atwiki.jp/kyodaiJudo/pages/77.html

 

Toketa or 解 け た – This is the past tense of the verb to escape or dissolve. It refers to escaping a Judo pin, Osaekomi.

 

Tomoenage or 巴投げ – This is an official Kodokan sacrifice throw. It is commonly performed by grabbing both collars while standing and dropping to one’s back while placing a foot in the opponent’s waist to hoist them over the player, who finishes executing the throw from the ground. Jump to minute 3:15 of this video:

l https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRF1Tzb3iPk

 

Uchimata or 内 股 – This is an official

l https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-CnJ1tvTGY

 

Ude-garami or 腕がらみ – This is a general term that refers to all bent armlocks that attack the elbow. The below video is an example of the most common form, which is called a “Kimura” after Masahiko Kimura, one of Judo’s most famous players. While a student at Takushoku U., Kimura won the 1936 Kosen Judo Taikai (高専柔道大会).

l https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVE82gH-v-g

 

 

Udegaeshi or 腕 返 し – This is a rarely seen sacrifice throw that is not recognized by the Kodokan. It involves twisting under the opponent’s arm so that they roll over the player to the ground and is somewhat reminiscent of Aikido. See:

l http://www19.atwiki.jp/kyodaiJudo/pages/66.html

 

Waza-ari or 技 有 り – This literally means “with technique” and recognizes a player’s action was executed with technique but not technique meriting a victory score of Ippon. The application is basically the same as Waza-ari in Kodokan Judo with some nuanced differences.

 

Waza-ari-awasete-ippon or 技 有 り 合 わ せ て 一 本 – This term is called out by the Head Referee after awarding a second Waza-ari to the same player. This term literally means, “taken together Ippon” and signifies that the second Waza-ari is combined with the first, which means the player earns a “combined” Ippon victory.

 

Yoko-sankaku-jime or 横 三 角 締 め – This is one variation of the Sankaku Jime choke where the attacking player is laying on his side facing the opponent’s feet. The opponent’s head is resting on the thigh of the player’s bottom leg with the top leg extending over the opponent’s torso and pinching the bottom leg on the far side. The opponent is effectively caught between the two legs, which are scissored, so that the head and far arm are pinched. See:

l https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJvmZsMGd_E

 

Please note that the Seven National University Judo Clubs are sponsoring an official translation of these rules. This unofficial translation should not be confused with the the forthcoming official translation.